The Wonderful World of Modding

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Recently I’ve been investing my free time into replaying ConcernedApe's Stardew Valley on my PC. While I also own the game on the Xbox One, the majority of my friends are PC players and with multiplayer mode active, I figured I might as well just get it especially considering it’s among my favorite indie games (which is the topic of our latest episode that you can check out here). Having Stardew Valley on the PC lends itself to an experience that isn’t possible on consoles: mods.

 Here there be...trains?

Here there be...trains?

Modifications, or mods, are adjustments made by players or fans of a game that can change different aspects of the game itself. They can range from simple cosmetic changes, game breaking features, or just something absolutely ridiculous. Skyrim is arguably the video game that is most known for its modding community, especially after the controversy surrounding Valve and Bethesda's attempt to make users pay for mods.

I have always been a strong supporter of using mods. I’m not known for being a purist of any kind when it comes to gaming, and as I’ve stated before I’m not particularly interested in challenging games and I will almost always play them at their easiest difficulty. Mods can cater to any type of player and fill the need of what it is they’re looking for in a game, whether they want to expand the game itself or update the graphics to something playable. While some may consider mods to be “cheating” of some sort, I don’t find it to be the case unless it is something that gives a player an unfair advantage over others in multiplayer games. When I played Fallout 4, I modded my playthrough because I don’t care about getting the achievements; I just wanted to play the game at my pace and have an easier time building settlements that didn’t look like total trash.

 Thank you for making my life easier.

Thank you for making my life easier.

Being able to play Stardew Valley with mods has made the experience even more enjoyable. Now I don’t have to waste precious time looking for a specific villager; I can just open my map and see their location. The added ability to warp to certain locations is also very nifty and while some may call this game breaking or cheating, I can’t say that I particularly care. I’m still able to spend large chunks of time playing the game itself and taking the necessary time to map out my farm and figure out what I need to donate to the Community Center.

What are your thoughts on mods in video games? Leave a comment below or a voicemail at (347) 509-5620.